SERIES 1    INTRODUCTION TO FACILITY MANAGEMENT

OVERVIEW

In this workshop, facility managers will be introduced to key concepts of Facility Management that range from the role they play in the organization to the skill sets and competencies required to effectively perform their work.

In addition, this workshop will give the facility manager a greater appreciation for what they manage in the workplace and the typical challenges they face on a daily basis.

With facilities typically being a company’s second largest asset, it is important for facility managers to play a key role in supporting the company’s largest asset — the employees. They can help improve employee productivity and job satisfaction, ultimately leading to improved financial outcomes for the company.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Describe the four basic functions of facility management.
  • List at least five job responsibilities for a facility manager.
  • Identify at least three technical skills and three business skills a facility manager must have to solve customer requirements.
  • Write down, for each basic function, at least one example of what a facility manager manages in the workplace.
  • Through class discussion, give at least two examples of cultural and local facility management challenges in your region of the world.
  • List and discuss examples for at least three of the 11 facility management competencies defined by IFMA

SERIES 2    OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE SERIES

Workshop 1: Introduction

OVERVIEW

In this workshop, facility managers will be introduced to key concepts of Operations and Maintenance that range from interior systems to exterior systems, roads and grounds.

In addition, this workshop will give the facility manager a greater appreciation for how proper planning in the design and construction phase can increase productivity and reduce overall Operations and Maintenance costs.

The cost to operate and maintain a facility is typically second only to personnel salaries in an organization, and is about three to five times the cost of design and construction.

Operations and Maintenance functions comprise the majority of the operations that must be managed on a day-to-day basis. They are the source of a large portion of the problems a facility manager might face (e.g., clogged plumbing, leaks, broken door hinges).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 1, you will be able to:

  • Understand facility activities; and match each group of facility activities to the correct principle area of facility operation
  • List at least three common preventive maintenance practices on building systems
  • Through class discussion, give examples of situations where lack of maintenance led to business interruptions
  • Describe at least three predictive maintenance techniques used to forecast operational failures
  • Identify facility expenses, and which are Operations and Maintenance costs and which are Capital costs
  • Given a component, look up its Estimated Useful Life (EUL) for budget planning purposes
  • Write down, in your own words, what facility “operations” means
  • Write down, in your own words, what facility “maintenance” means

Workshop 2: The Basics of Building Systems

OVERVIEW

The role of the facility manager is to manage outcomes. The outcome of a well-managed building is that the building systems operate efficiently and deliver a comfortable environment for the occupants. The facility manager generally is not expected to know how to operate the boiler or chiller, or be able to repair the fire alarm or perform maintenance on the lift system. However, a working knowledge of these systems is helpful in knowing how to better manage them.

Building systems generally are operated by licensed building engineers and specialized repair technicians. These engineers and technicians have received specialized training in chiller and boiler operation, in the handling of potentially hazardous materials such as refrigerants and in the regulatory requirements for safe operation of very specialized equipment.

This module’s intent is to provide a general overview of each of the major building systems so the facility manager has a better understanding of how to mange both the personnel who take care of the building equipment and know when the equipment is being serviced properly.

It is not the intent of this module to make a facility manager as knowledgeable about building engineering as the building engineer. It is intended to give the facility manager a general knowledge of building systems so he or she can manage the workforce that provides the special knowledge of the proper repair and maintenance practices that lead to a well-run facility.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 2, you will be able to:

  • List the areas exterior to a building that should be part of a building site’s maintenance plan.
  • Identify the design, installation, and maintenance requirements for a roofing system.
  • Describe at least four things to maintain in order to maximize capabilities of HVAC systems.
  • State at least two ways to maintain a facility’s electrical system.
  • Write down, in your own words, two strategies that help address plumbing system problems.
  • Write down, in your own words, at least three important questions to answer to ensure proper maintenance on fire protection systems.
  • Give two examples of activities, in class discussion, that help to maintain telecommunications equipment and software.
  • List at least three ways that help enforce the proper use of elevators (lifts) and escalators.
  • Identify six key areas to maintain for a building’s interior system.

Workshop 3: The Application of Technology

OVERVIEW

This workshop provides an understanding of software technologies used in Facility Management including Building Automation Systems (BAS), Energy Management Systems (EMS), Integrated Workplace Management Systems (IWMS) and “cloud” and Saas software applications.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 3, you will be able to:

  • List at least three benefits of using facility automation technology for facility management.
  • Identify the building systems that the Energy Management Systems (EMS) will monitor and control.
  • Discuss the key challenges of using automated technology for facility management.
  • Write down, in your own words, at least three benefits of using Building Automation Systems (BAS).
  • State at least two things that need to be considered before purchasing BAS equipment.
  • Identify the two capabilities of advanced Energy Management Systems (EMS).
  • Describe at least two ways a facility can limit the demands of electrical energy consumption.
  • Give two examples, in class discussion, of the benefits of using Integrated Workplace Management Systems (IWMS) in a facility.
  • List at least two facility management categories for IWMS applications.
  • Describe at least two important features to consider before purchasing IWMS applications.

Workshop 4: The Implications of Health and Safety Managing Buildings

OVERVIEW

Health and safety are two of the most important responsibilities in facility management. The comfort and well-being of building occupants and keeping the workforce safe in the case of emergencies is a company responsibility that is often assigned to the facility manager. The facility manager is also responsible for the safety of the facility management workforce while carrying out the day-to-day operations that keep a facility running. A third key area of responsibility for the facility manager is keeping the building and building systems in compliance with codes and standards.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 4, you will be able to:

  • List at least two steps used in the risk assessment process for the health and safety of building occupants.
  • Write down, in your own words, the different ways building occupants can receive fire and life safety training.
  • Identify the leadership role recommended for a facility’s emergency response team.
  • State at least two things that should be included in a contingency plan for a facility-related emergency.
  • Give two examples, in class discussion, of potential hazards that require personal protective equipment (PPE).
  • List at least five types of PPE used to protect the human body in hazardous situations.
  • Describe at least four sources of hazardous energy that require lock-out tag-out (LOTO) procedures.
  • Identify the latest standard used to communicate information about hazardous materials to building occupants.
  • State the main purpose of using building codes for construction.
  • Write down, in your own words, how a facility manager’s participation in the development of ISO standards may benefit the facilities he/she manages

SERIES 3    WORK MANAGEMENT IN FACILITIES

Workshop 1: Supervisory Roles in Facility Management

OVERVIEW

About this series

In the IFMA Work Management Series, facility management professionals will be introduced to various aspects of facility work management, starting with the supervisor’s critical role. The series will introduce key concepts including planning, scheduling and metrics and how they affect the efficiency of a facility management organization. In addition, this series will give participants a greater appreciation for how utilizing work management tools can increase productivity. Finally, proper work management techniques will be provided for managing facility service contracts and customer relations, two central parts of facility management.

About this workshop

This workshop provides an understanding of the facility supervisor’s “work management” role in the organization – particularly around time management, decision-making, communication and leadership. It also provides the basics of planning, scheduling work and managing productivity. Finally, this workshop gives insights on how to identify time, cost and resources in order to manage work effectively and efficiently.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 1, you will be able to:

  • List at least three decision-making strategies for facility work management.
  • State at least two communication strategies for facility work management.
  • Discuss the benefits of using management by walking around (MBWA) for facility supervisors.
  • Write down, in your own words, at least two benefits of planning and scheduling work.
  • State at least two planning and scheduling strategies for facility work management.

Workshop 2: Applying Work Management to Building Systems

OVERVIEW

About this series

In the IFMA Work Management Series, facility management professionals will be introduced to various aspects of facility work management, starting with the supervisor’s critical role. The series will introduce key concepts including planning, scheduling and metrics and how they affect the efficiency of a facility management organization. In addition, this series will give participants a greater appreciation for how utilizing work management tools can increase productivity. Finally, proper work management techniques will be provided for managing facility service contracts and customer relations, two central parts of facility management.

About this workshop

This workshop provides an understanding of how to apply work management to building systems in facilities. The different types of facility work are discussed along with the various work management programs used to perform tasks. In addition, key principles of planning and scheduling work are explained. Finally, this workshop covers the basics of metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs) used in facility work management.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 2, you will be able to:

  • Identify the four elements of the Reliability-centered Maintenance (RCM) strategy.
  • List at least four different types of equipment and building system failure modes.
  • Discuss how criticality codes for building equipment can help FMs prioritize work.
  • Identify the five facility work priority levels and their respective response times.
  • Write down, in your own words, at least two benefits of using work performance standards.
  • State at least two examples of facility work processes.
  • Describe at least two benefits of using standard inspection processes in facility work.
  • List at least three guiding principles for planning work.
  • List at least three guiding principles for scheduling work.
  • Identify the five process steps for planning and scheduling work.
  • Discuss how key performance indicators (KPIs) serve as a useful work management tool.

Workshop 3: Work Management Tools in Facility Management

OVERVIEW

About this series

In the IFMA Work Management Series, facility management professionals will be introduced to various aspects of facility work management, starting with the supervisor’s critical role. The series will introduce key concepts including planning, scheduling and metrics and how they affect the efficiency of a facility management organization. In addition, this series will give participants a greater appreciation for how utilizing work management tools can increase productivity. Finally, proper work management techniques will be provided for managing facility service contracts and customer relations, two central parts of facility management.

About this workshop

This workshop provides an understanding of various work management tools utilized in facility management organizations. The workshop begins with productivity and how productivity plays a role in the effective management of facilities. The determination and calculation of productivity metrics are discussed along with the basics of automated work management. In addition, scheduling tools used for work management are explained.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 3, you will be able to:

  • Understand how productivity can be used as a tool.
  • Identify the three types of work productivity.
  • Discuss how facility work productivity data can be misused.
  • Describe at least one way to calculate work productivity.
  • List at least two examples of what a spreadsheet can do for facility work management.
  • Identify at least two benefits of using an electronic calendar in facility work management.

Workshop 3: Managing Contractors in Facility Management

OVERVIEW

About this series

In the IFMA Work Management Series, facility management professionals will be introduced to various aspects of facility work management, starting with the supervisor’s critical role. The series will introduce key concepts including planning, scheduling and metrics and how they affect the efficiency of a facility management organization. In addition, this series will give participants a greater appreciation for how utilizing work management tools can increase productivity. Finally, proper work management techniques will be provided for managing facility service contracts and customer relations, two central parts of facility management.

About this workshop

This workshop provides an understanding of the different types of facility contracts and how to use them to enhance the facility management function. In addition, the steps necessary to write a request for proposal are discussed. Finally, ways to achieve successful partnerships with service providers are explained.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 4, you will be able to:

  • List at least three facility management services that are typically found on service contracts.
  • Identify three types of facility service contracts.
  • Discuss how outcome-based facility service contracts are different traditional contracts.
  • Identify at least two questions that will help determine which facility should be outsourced.
  • Describe the four steps needed to write a facility service request for (RFP).
  • Write down, in your own words, how to evaluate facility service proposals.
  • List up to four members who could be part of the service administration team.
  • Identify the main difference between quality control (QC) and assurance (QA).
  • Discuss at least two benefits of monitoring facility service contracts.
  • Describe how partnering works in facility service contracts.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 3, you will be able to:

  • Describe the function of at least two modules found in typical CMMS software.
  • Write down, in your own words, the key process steps in the work task life cycle.
  • Discuss what questions to ask when you experience obstacles to getting work tasks accomplished in order to find solutions.
  • Describe the importance of accurate data input to the CMMS.
  • List at least three benefits of using metrics as a facility work management tool.

About this series

In the IFMA Work Management Series, facility management professionals will be introduced to various aspects of facility work management, starting with the supervisor’s critical role. The series will introduce key concepts including planning, scheduling and metrics and how they affect the efficiency of a facility management organization. In addition, this series will give participants a greater appreciation for how utilizing work management tools can increase productivity. Finally, proper work management techniques will be provided for managing facility service contracts and customer relations, two central parts of facility management.

Workshop 5: Managing and Tracking Customer Relations in Facility Management

OVERVIEW

About this series

In the IFMA Work Management Series, facility management professionals will be introduced to various aspects of facility work management, starting with the supervisor’s critical role. The series will introduce key concepts including planning, scheduling and metrics and how they affect the efficiency of a facility management organization. In addition, this series will give participants a greater appreciation for how utilizing work management tools can increase productivity. Finally, proper work management techniques will be provided for managing facility service contracts and customer relations, two central parts of facility management.

About this workshop

This workshop provides an understanding of how to meet customer expectations and increase customer satisfaction. Different methods of collecting customer feedback are discussed and techniques for dealing with positive and negative customer feedback are explained.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

At the completion of Workshop 5, you will be able to:

  • List at least three ways to satisfy customers in the context of facility management.
  • Identify at least three questions that should be asked in order to better manage customer expectations.
  • Discuss how metrics can be used to help meet customer expectations.
  • Write down, in your own words, at least two ways in which facility managers  can better manage customer service.
  • State at least two outcomes that valid and reliable customer surveys must have.
  • Identify at least two common mistakes that are made when using customer surveys.
  • Describe how any gaps identified from customer survey results can help improve facility services.
  • Discuss at least two ways a facility can deal with positive customer feedback.
  • Discuss at least two ways a facility can deal with negative customer feedback.
  • Write down, in your own words, the key process steps in a continual improvement model.